Best practices for a successful recruiting process.

It’s every young athlete’s dream: That someday all those endless practices, tiring scrimmages, overpriced equipment and exhausting games might translate into a chance to play sports on the collegiate level.

But with less than 10 percent of all high school athletes playing their given sport at an NCAA-member institution, and just a third of those receiving an athletic scholarship, it’s crucial that players and parents learn all they can about this confusing, difficult and oftentimes frustrating process known as recruiting.

No matter what any one person or organization claims, nobody can guarantee you or your child an athletic scholarship. But it’s our hope  that this recruiting resource, along with additional information you gather along the way, can help you take control of the recruiting process and ultimately make a dream come true.

Women’s DI Recruiting Calendar

DI Calendar

Women’s DII Recruiting Calendar

DII Calendar

Women’s Recruiting Guide

Recruiting Guide

Create a Profile

We ask that you create profiles on the following websites to help improve your chances of being recruited.

http://www.ncsasports.org/

www.berecruited.com

ncaa registration

Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center

The process is relatively pain-free; all you need is $50 and a Social Security number. But don’t leave it to the last minute. Every year a few student athletes miss out on the chance to play collegiately, because they fail to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center.

highlight videos

Create a Highlight Tape

The recruiting video is one of the most important ways an athlete can attract the attention of coaches at the university level.

The structure and contents of your video should include a collection of 10-15 highlight plays, Practice footage and work ethic habits such as training and weight lifting, and Continuous play sports like basketball also need to included a full half of a basketball game to demonstrate real-time ability.

Testing Transcripts & Class Schedules

As of August 1, 2008, NCAA Division I will require 16 core courses. Division II required 14 core courses, but increased to 16 core courses August 1, 2013. View the NCAA Freshman Eligibility Standards Quick Reference Sheet for more information on these requirements.

This important step allows for college coaches to verify that you are eligible and provides them academic information on the student-athlete. You are encouraged to submit transcripts and test scores (SAT/ACT) for their review. You will be assigned a pin number that they can use to confirm this information.

Just like there are rules to follow in games, the NCAA is all about rules and guidelines to better serve student-athletes and their parents.

College Visits & Final Decisions

Keep in mind that athletic scholarships are awarded through the colleges, not through the NCAA. Once you have chosen a handful of schools that you are interested in, you should find out what the individual schools’ requirements and application procedures are in addition to the requirements outlined by the NCAA.

Quick Facts

INTERESTED IN PLAYING IN COLLEGE?

If you’re a top student-athlete interested in playing basketball in college, here’s a quick checklist of things you need to do:

  • Fill out questionnaire: Call the Basketball office at the schools you are interested in to receive a copy of their prospective student-athlete questionnaire.
  • Understand the eligibility guidelines: You can check NCAA eligibility guidelines and register with the NCAA clearinghouse at the official NCAA web site.
  • Complete a CSS Profile: The College Scholarship Service is the financial aid division of most schools. Many colleges, universities, and scholarship programs use the information collected on PROFILE to help them award non-federal student aid funds.
  • Contact Admissions: Formal applications are processed through each school’s Office of Admissions. For information on applying, contact the Office of Admissions. You can also download many applications from the school’s web sites.

SAT INFO

  • For more information, to register or to find the next test date for the SAT I or II, please visit www.collegeboard.com

ACT INFO

  • For more information, to register or to find the next test date for the ACT, please visit www.act.org

CONTACTS

As a high school student-athlete, you may call, write, fax or email colleges at any time.

This is a basketball rule: as College coaches, they may call you on or after June 21 following your Junior year.

As college coaches, they may write, fax or email you only after September 1 of your Junior year of high school. There is no limit on the number of correspondences per week.

CAMPUS VISITS

Unofficial Visit – When you, as a prospect, visit a college campus at your own expense. There is no limit on how many times you may visit a college “unofficially”.

Official Visit – When you, as a prospect, visit a college campus at the partial or total expense of the college’s representative of athletics (i.e. a coach). You may only take five (5) official visits in total and never more than one (1) to the same school.

What you need to know right now….

Frequently Asked Questions
What is a contact?

A contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.

What is a contact period?

During a contact period a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

What is an evaluation period?

During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

What is a quiet period?

During a quiet period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

What is a dead period?

During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?

Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.

During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the prospect, lodging and three meals per day for both the prospect and the parent or guardian, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event.

The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.

What is a National Letter of Intent?

A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II college or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee the student-athlete financial aid.

The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

Signing an National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.

What are recruiting calendars?

Recruiting calendars help promote the well-being prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.